raah e irfan sey jo hum naadidah ru mahram nahiN

Discussion in 'Hadayiq e Bakhshish' started by abu Hasan, Apr 7, 2016.

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  1. abu Hasan

    abu Hasan Administrator

    to restate the below: if you imagine yourself to be at zamzam and kawsar is awaited:

    is meiN zamzam hai ke tham-tham us meiN jam-jam hai ke beesh

    ---
    but if you assume that one saying this is present at kawthar, and zamzam is a past

    us
    meiN zamzam hai ke tham-tham, is meiN jam-jam hai ke beesh

    ---
     
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  2. abu Hasan

    abu Hasan Administrator

    us - THAT
    is - THIS

    ---
    zamzam is referred to as an event long past, hence "us mein zamzam'

    kawsar is here, now and present in the future - hence 'THIS' "is mein jam-jam"

    Allah ta'ala knows best.
     
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  3. Aqdas

    Aqdas Staff Member

    AH, you've transliterated us meiN zamzam, is meiN jam-jam.

    Some read it, is meiN zamzam, us meiN jam -jam...

    What say?
     
  4. Aqdas

    Aqdas Staff Member

    some of our newcomers may have missed this so i'm posting so they don't miss out!

    as for alahazrat's poetry:

    dil se jo baat nikalti hai asar rakhti hai
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  5. abu Hasan

    abu Hasan Administrator

    thanks for pointing out that a key was missing.

    corrected pronto.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2008
  6. abu nibras

    abu nibras Staff Member

    subHan allaH ! may allah bless you for this beautiful translation and explanation.

    I have been looking for a rendering of this naat by Qari Mushtaq or someone of his caliber.

    us meiN zamzam hai key tham-tham; is meiN jam-jam hai key beesh
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2008
  7. Missing She'r in the Naa't

    Missing She'r

    5)
    Unko be manghe mila, inko raghard kar irdiyaan!
    Malike Kawsar ke hamsar, Sahibe Zamzam nahin

    (a'laihi salaam wa sall Allahu a'laihi wa Aalihi wasallam)

    "Malike Kawsar" refers to Sayyiduna Rasulullah sall Allahu a'laihi wa Aalihi wasallam

    "Sahibe Zamzam" refers to Sayyiduna Ismai'l a'laihi salam

    This she'r is not generally found in Hadaiqe Bakhshish; Shaykh A'llamah Muhammad Shabir al Kotli mentions in his Safar Namah that this is also a she'r that A'la Hadrat Imam Ahmad Rida radi Allahu Ta'ala a'nhu wrote.

    Then he goes on to explain that Sayyiduna Ismai'l a'laihi salaam was granted Zamzam by rubbing his ankles on the ground and Sayyiduna Rasulullah sall Allahu a'laihi wa Aalihi wasallam was granted the Hawd (fount) of al Kawthar (Kawsar) without even asking for it!
    Therefore the rank of the Prophet Muhammad sall Allahu a'laihi wa Aalihi wasallam is loftier.

    Subhan Allah

    (al Haqaiq fil Hadaiq Sharh Hadaiqe Bakhshish Volume 5 page 96-97)
     
  8. abu Hasan

    abu Hasan Administrator

    check the sharH below. an attempt to explain alahazrat's beautiful poem.
     
  9. Explanation by Shaykh A'llamah Mufti Faid Ahmad al Awaisi al Qadri hafizahullah

    For the Explanation of the Naa't Shareef see al Haqaiq fil Hadaiq by the Khalifah of al Mufti al Aa'zam Imam Mustafa Rida an Nuri radi Allahu a'nhu; Shaykh A'llamah Mufti Faid Ahmad al Awaisi al Qadri ar Ridwi hafizahullah. Volume 5 page 89 Naa't Shareef 38.

    Shaykh ul Islam al Mujaddid ul Aa'zam Imam Ahmad Rida radi Allahu Ta'ala a'nhu's Naa'ts are really amazing and Mufti Faid Ahmad al Awaisi hafizahullah 's explanations really unlock the treasured meanings of the Asha'ar.

    Subhan Allah
     
  10. calltoallah

    calltoallah Active Member

    can somebody please direct me to the audio of this naat please?
     
  11. masha Allah. Beautiful translation :)
     
  12. abu Hasan

    abu Hasan Administrator

    sharH

    bismillahi'r raHmani'r Rahim.

    rāh e írfāN sey jo hum, nā dīdah rū maĥram nahīN
    Muşţafā hai masnad e irshād par kuchh gham nahīN

    We, who have not seen the path of enlightenment and are unaware -
    Yet, have no cause to worry since Muşţafā is upon the lofty seat of guidance.


    rāh e írfāN: the path of enlightenment, gnosis.
    nā dīdah rū : who has not seen the beauty
    maĥram: aware, to know
    masnad: seat,
    irshād: guidance
    gham nahīN: an idiom to mean: ‘not to worry’

    Even though we are not competent to struggle in this path and attain enlightenment or capable to strive towards gnosis, we need not despair; Muşţafā şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam who is the Prince of the Kingdom of Gnosis will guide us towards it. This is derived from the verse:
    wa innaka la tahdī ilā şirāţin mustaqīm
    Verily you guide [people] towards the Right path. [Al-Shūrā, v.52]

    In a ĥadīth is the promise: ‘A man will be with whom he loves [on Judgement day].’ So, we love Muşţafā şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam and he is the leader of the guided and the guides; and we hope to be with him in spite of our ignorance and weakness.

    ----
    hūN musalmāN garchey nāqiş hī sahī ay kāmilO
    māhiyat pānī ki ākhir yam sey nam meiN kam nahīN
    O, the accomplished ones! I too am a Muslim, even if deficient –
    A drop of water is no different from the sea, in its property of being water.


    nāqiş: deficient
    māhiyat: property, the state of being
    yam: sea
    nam: moisture

    Just as a little drop is called 'water', the rivers and the seas are also called water; after all, they are the same in their property of being water – even if they differ in quantity or quality. I am a Muslim; even though, I am not one with plenteous deeds and pious like the righteous, the awliyā. But since I am a Muslim, I hope for the intercession of my Prophet şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam who said: ‘I will intercede for the wrongdoers amongst my followers.’

    ---
    ghunchey mā awĥā key jo chaTkey danā key bāgh meiN
    bulbul e sidrah tak un kī bū sey bhī maĥram nahīN
    The beautiful flowers of ‘He was given a revelation..’ blossomed in the garden of Nearness,
    And they were so high that even the Nightingale of Sidrah [Gabriel] did not catch a whiff of its fragrance

    ghunchey: meaning bunch, but used here as a bunch of flowers
    chaTakna: mean to be colorful, blossom, shine
    mā awĥā: a reference to the verse: ‘fa awĥā ilā ábdihī mā awĥā’ / and then [Allāh] revealed to his bondsman that which he revealed [Sūrah An-Najm, v.10]
    danā: meaning nearness. as it is mentioned in the verse: thumma danā fa-tadalla / and then, he approached and went closer.’ [Sūrah An-Najm, v.8]
    bulbul e sidrah: Gibrīl álayhi’s salām, the nightingale of sidrah.
    : fragrance

    That is, on the Night of Ascension, RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam went so far and where he went, in the Gardens of Nearness, he was inspired [waĥy] by the Lord and was revealed that which no one knows – even the archangel Gibrīl álayhi’s salām could not catch a whiff of its fragrance because he was so far above. And the Lord Almighty Himself closed the subject: ‘He revealed that which He revealed.

    As Imām Būsīrī says in Burdah:
    wa bitta tarqā ilā an nilta manzilatan
    min qābi qawsayni lam tudrak wa lam turamī

    and you kept ascending until you reached the goal
    of ‘two bow-lengths’ which none has attained, nor anyone can aspire.
    That is you reached the nearness of the Lord Almighty such that the closeness was ‘two bow-lengths or less.’ A rank that no one has attained even among the prophets other than you, nor does anybody dare to seek because of its immense greatness. ‘Two bow-lengths’ or qāba qawsayn is originally from the term qābay qaws [the two arches of the bow] but the words are transposed. This is a phrase to indicate ‘very little distance.’ Because a bow has two arches and there is very little distance between the two [in the middle, where one holds the bow]. see here.

    Therefore, the Closeness of RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam is described as if it were the distance between the two arches. However this is metaphorical nearness [al-qurb al-mánawī] and not physical, because Allāh táālā transcends all direction and distance:
    wa dhātan án jihāti’s sitti khālī
    He transcends, and is free from all six directions
    RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam reached such nearness that no one can reach nor even aspire. And this is a special status only for RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam. And then Allāh táālā says: ‘and then he approached came near.’
    hattā idhā lam tadá-a sha-wan li mustabiqin
    mina’d dunuwwi wa lā marqan li mustanimi

    so much so that when you reached the farthest place one can go
    that of closeness and which cannot be surpassed by anyone.
    That is, you kept ascending and left behind every rank and stature until you reached the Nearness which nobody else can attain nor hope to ascend.
    sha-wā means the farthest place anyone can endeavor to reach.
    mustabiq: one who endeavors.
    marqā: status, rank, grade.
    mustanim: one who aspires to soar.
    [Translation and explanation of the couplets from the Burdah is adapted from two exegeses of Burdah: one by Imām Bājūrī and another by Shaykh Khālid al-Az’harī]

    ---
    us meiN zamzam hai key tham-tham; is meiN jam-jam hai key beesh
    kasrat e kawsar meiN zam-zam kee ţarah kam-kam nahīN

    It is Zamzam that is restrained; and this is ever-flowing, ample
    There is no measure for the abundance of the fount of Kawthar.

    Zamzam is the well, the spring near the Kábah in Mecca. When the spring gushed out from the ground, Hājirah, the mother of Prophet Ismāýīl álayhimā as-salām was afraid that the precious water would be absorbed in the sand around. So she drew a circle around it and said: ‘zam-zam!’ which means ‘stop! stop!’ in Syriac. This water stayed within this circle and became a well. It is said in the ĥadīth that if she hadn’t cordoned it, the spring would have surged and become a sea.

    tham-tham
    : stop, stop! which is the translation of the word ‘zam zam’ in Syriac.

    jam-jam
    : abundant, ample.

    kasrat/kathrah
    : abundance. It is used to define the measure of something as said in Al-Mufradāt.

    kawsar/kawthar
    : the ever-flowing and abundant stream or fount from paradise. Lisan Al-Árab: Derived from kathura meaning lot. And Al-Kawthar is plenty and abundance of everything. As it is said in the verse: ‘We have given you Al-Kawthar’ which means: Plenty of everything: knowledge, good deeds and the bounty of both worlds. Imām Rāghib in Al-Mufradāt: It is also said that it means the abundant bounty received by RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam. Also, a generous man is known as Kawthar [wa qad yuqāl li’r rajul as-sakhī: kawthar]. It is said: ‘something in abundance’ [takawthar ash-shayy] meaning it is extreme in copiousness and abundance.

    kam-kam: kam in arabic is ‘how much’ but in urdu means ‘little.’

    Even an expert can miss the subtlety in this couplet; therefore, Alahazrat has himself added footnotes to orient the reader towards it which I have faithfully incorporated above.

    Zamzam is also a gift of a Prophet with ethereal qualities; but it is limited. It is restrained. Whereas, Kawthar is abundant and copious. Verily, the generous lord [Kawthar] does not ask how much when giving from his overflowing sea of goodness and nor is their any limit to the plenteousness of the fount.

    Alliteration and Euphony: zamzam, tham-tham, jam-jam, kam-kam.
    Homonyms: kam-kam meaning how-much in Arabic and very little in Urdu
    Antithesis: zam-zam, tham-tham means stop-stop; jam-jam, beesh means abundant; also, jam-jam is abundant, kam-kam is less.


    ----
    panjah e mihr e árab hai jis sey daryā bah gaye
    chashmah e khurshīd meiN to nām ko bhī nam nahīN

    It is the palm of the Sun of Arabia from which rivers gush forth,
    The sun [in the sky] is devoid of even a little moisture.


    mihr: sun
    chashmah e khurshīd: chashmah means a spring or a stream; but when used with khurshīd or āftāb, it is just an idiom to describe the sun.
    nām: [here] even for namesake
    nam: moisture

    The sun in the sky does not have moisture even for namesake; however, this Sun of Arabia is such that rivers gush from his hands. Because the law of nature is that bright and warm stars can dry the wateriness; but this Sun shines but yet cool springs of water flow from his hands.

    ---
    aysa ummī kis liye minnat kash e ustād hO
    kyā kifāyat is ko iqra’a rabbuka’l akram nahīN
    Why should this ummi be beholden to any teacher?
    Is it not enough that the Most Honorable and Most Bountiful Lord has taught him to read?


    ummi: One who has not formally learnt to read; book-learned. People wrongly translate this as illiterate when referring to RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam and Alahazrat refutes this short-sighted literalism.

    minnat-kash
    : to be beholden, burdened with favor

    iqra’a rabbuka’l akram
    : allusion to the Qur’ānic verse: iqra’a wa rabbuka’l akram / read and your Lord is the Most Bountiful. [Sūrah Al-álaq, v.3 ]

    When the Most Bountiful Lord has taught him to read, why should he be beholden to any other worldly teachers? That is RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam was taught by Allāh táālā and did not learn from any one in the creation. Therefore, his title ummi means, one who did not learn from any other teacher nor from books except that, Allāh táālā taught him.

    Karam means to bestows without any expectation of recompense or requital. RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam is Karīm, generous – but his Lord is the Most Generous, Al-Akram. His Generosity and Bounty is Absolute whereas every other person who grants favors is by His leave [Al-Rāzī, Tafsir Al-Kabīr].

    On the word Ummī from Al-Rāzī’s Mafātīĥ al-Ghayb in Sūrah Al-Aárāf, v.157
    The third attribute: RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam being an Ummī. An ummī is one whose attributes are similar to the Arabs [of old]. RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam said: ‘We are a nation that is not literate – we do not write and we do not keep accounts.’ That is, most Arabs could neither write nor read and so was RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam, and was therefore described thus. Scholars explain that in this meaning, it is a miracle of RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam for three reasons:

    First, because he would recite the Qur’ān in order and the same order subsequently without ever changing nor displacing a single word; however, an orator among the arabs made a speech and then returned to repeat it, he would add or modify in any measure [whether little or entirely changed]; but RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam, though he did not write nor read from a book – would recite from the Book of Allāh without a minute change nor add or drop a word. This is a miracle and this is the meaning of a further verse: ‘sa nuqri-uka fa lā tansā’ / and We shall recite such that you will never forget [Sūrah Al-Aálā, v.6]

    Second, if he wrote and read from a book, he would be accused of plagiarising it by reading the books of yore; and this incredible knowledge was gained by them. Therefore, he brought this Lofty Book, the Qur’ān which contains exquisite knowledge and wisdom – without having ever reading from a book nor learning from another teacher. Thus, it is a miracle and that is why Allāh táālā says: ‘You did not read this in a book before, nor did you write it with your right hand, lest the falsifiers make it doubtful.’ [Sūrah Al-Ankabūt, v.48]

    Third: learning to write is an ordinary skill and anyone with little intelligence and comprehension can learn to write with very little effort. And if someone cannot learn to write [in spite of training] would indicate that one has very limited mental faculties. Allāh táālā gave RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam the knowledge of those past and those who shall come and gave him immense knowledge and realization that no man can hope to attain; yet, in spite of such great intelligence and comprension, Allāh made him to not write or made him to learn from those lesser [than him] in knowledge or understanding. This huge contradiction – immense knowledge and wisdom but still not learning to write – is a sign, a defying miracle.
    In the Burdah:
    kafāka bi’l ílmi fi’l ummiyi mújizatan
    fi’l jāhiliyyati wa’t ta-adībi fi’l yutumī

    It is sufficient for you O ummī, that you were granted knowledge as a miracle
    In the pagan times and were taught [manners and virtue] though you were an orphan
    Ummi is derived from Umm meaning mother; that is one who has remained unaltered and in the same state after being borne by his mother. In usage [úrf], it means a person who does not know how to read or write; or a person who has not received an education in the common manner by learning from a teacher; jāhiliyyah or pagan times is mentioned here because, that was an age when knowledge was scarce; and learning etiquette [ta’dib] is mentioned because it is usually the father who teaches these things and orphans miss that.

    That is, RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam came with immense knowledge as a miracle in spite of having not learnt to read or write [in the tutelage of anybody] and living among pagans who had no knowledge and having been raised as an orphan – yet his lofty manners and incredible knowledge was given by Allāh táālā Himself as RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam said: ‘Verily Allāh táālā has taught me etiquette and trained me in the most beautiful manners.’

    ---
    aws mihr e ĥashr par paDh jāye pyāsO to sahee
    us gul e khandāN kā ronā giryah e shabnam nahīN
    O thirsty sinners! Let the fiery burning sun be dampened, diminished on Judgement day
    For, the weeping of this radiant flower is not meager like that of dew

    aws: dew, mist
    mihr-e-ĥashr: the sun on judgement day
    gul-e-khandāN: beautiful flower, radiant flower
    giryah: to weep, to beseech
    shabnam: dew, mist.
    aws paDhna: is an urdu phrase that means: to diminish, to quench, to dampen, to wither, to extinguish, to be ashamed.
    aws chaTey pyās nahiN bujhti’is an idiom meaning one cannot quench their thirst by licking the dew. This idiom is modified as a complex metalepsis to get a wonderful effect in this verse.

    O Sinners, you are thirsty and do you not wish that the heat and fury of the sun on judgement day be extinguished and quenched? In other words aws paDhna or let it be diminished; but then, one cannot quench their thirst with dew nor does dew extinguish a flame – Behold! Here comes the radiant flower that is not withered in the intense heat of the sun, nor is his beseeching have a mild effect like that of dew; he weeps for our sakes and to deliver us, and that is a torrent – relieving us of thirst and puts out the fiery sun.
    aap rotey jaayeNgey hum ko haNsaatey jaayeNgey
    he shall weep to make us laugh again.
    and
    nayyir e ĥashr ney ik aag lagaa rakhi hai
    teyz hai dhuup miley saayah e daamaN hum ko

    the sun on Judgement day, has ignited a fierce flame
    harsh is the sun, grant us the shade of your mantle!
    ---
    hai unhīN key dam qadam kī bāgh e áālam meiN bahār
    woh na they, áālam na thā; gar woh na hoN áālam nahīN
    The garden of this world flourishes on account of his presence,
    The world was not created when he was not; and if he wouldn’t be, the world wouldn’t.


    This is a straight forward verse and commonly understood; it is similar to the verse in Burdah:
    law lā hu lam takhruji’d dunyā mina’l ádami
    if he did not exist, the universe would not have come out of non-existence.
    This is derived from the ĥadīth narrated by Al-Ĥākim and Al-Bayhaqi that Ādam álayhi’s salām saw the formula lā ilā illā Allāh Muĥammad RasūlAllāh written on the ársh and enquired about it. Allāh táālā replied: ‘if it were not for him, I would not have created you.’ [Bājūrī]

    ---
    sāyah e dīwār o khāk e dar ho yā rab aur razā
    khwāhish e dayhīm e qayşar shawq e takht e jam nahīN
    My Lord! All that Raza yearns for, is the shade of the walls and dust from his dwelling,
    I do not wish for Caesar’s crown or want Chosroe's throne.


    sāyah e dīwār: the shade of the walls of his dwelling and khāk e dar: the dust from his abode, are both idioms to indicate one’s attachment and extreme veneration to one’s beloved.
    dayhīm: a crown
    qayşar: Caesar, the emperor of Rome.
    jam: is a contraction of Jamshīd, as in jām-e-jam: the chalice of Jamshīd. He was one of the legendary rulers of Persia and hence I have replaced it with Chosroe to rhyme with Caesar in my English translation.
    takht e jam: Jamshīd is the last greatest king in Persian mythology; naturally the phrase means ‘the power or authority or the kingdom of Jamshed’

    Alahazrat rađiyAllāhu ánhu yearns for his beloved and is so drowned in the love of the Prophet şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam that he has no interest in either the crown of Caesar nor the kingdom of Jamshīd; all he wants, is the shade of the Prophet’s wall and dust from his doorstep.
    ham khāk uDayengey agar khāk na pāyī
    ābād raza jis pey madīnah hai hamārah
    we shall truly be deprived, if we don’t attain that dust
    of the blessed land on which our beloved madinah rests.
    and he says:
    sotey haiN unkey saaye meiN koyi hameN jagaye kyuN
    we sleep in the shade [of his fence], why does anybody rouse us?
    Allah ta'ala knows best.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2008
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  13. abu Hasan

    abu Hasan Administrator

    1. We, who have not seen the path of enlightenment and are unaware -
    2. Yet, have no cause to worry since Muşţafā is upon the lofty seat of guidance.

    3. O, the accomplished ones! I too am a Muslim, even if deficient –
    4. A drop of water is no different from the sea, in its property of being water.

    5. The beautiful flowers of ‘He was given a revelation..’ blossomed in the garden of Nearness,
    6. And they were so high that even the Nightingale of Sidrah [Gabriel] did not catch a whiff of it

    7. It is Zamzam that is restrained; and this is ever-flowing, ample
    8. There is no measure for the abundance of the fount of Kawthar.

    9. It is the palm of the Sun of Arabia from which rivers gush forth,
    10. The sun [in the sky] is devoid of even a little moisture.

    11. Why should this ummi be beholden to any teacher?
    12. Is it not enough that the Most Honorable and Bountiful Lord has taught him to read?

    13. O thirsty sinners! Let the fiery burning sun be dampened, diminished on Judgement day
    14. For, the weeping of this radiant flower is not meager like that of dew

    15. The garden of this world flourishes on account of his presence,
    16. The world was not created when he was not; and if he wouldn’t be, the world wouldn’t.

    17. O my Lord! All that Raza yearns for, is the shade of the walls and dust from his dwelling,
    18. I do not wish for Caesar’s crown or want Chosroe's throne.

    ----
    a mere translation is not sufficient; a further explanation is required to describe the finer points of the poem. inshaAllah wa bi tawfiqihi.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2008
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  14. abu Hasan

    abu Hasan Administrator

    1. rāh e írfāN sey jo hum, nā dīdah rū maĥram nahīN
    2. Muşţafā hai masnad e irshād par kuchh gham nahīN

    3. hūN musalmāN garchey nāqiş hī sahī ay kāmilO
    4. māhiyat pānī ki ākhir yam sey nam meiN kam nahīN

    5. ghunchey mā awĥā key jo chaTkey danā key bāgh meiN
    6. bulbul e sidrah tak un kī bū sey bhī maĥram nahīN

    7. us meiN zamzam hai key tham-tham; is meiN jam-jam hai key beesh
    8. kasrat e kawsar meiN zam-zam kee ţarah kam-kam nahīN

    9. panjah e mihr e árab hai jis sey daryā bah gaye
    10. chashmah e khurshīd meiN to nām ko bhī nam nahīN

    11. aysa ummī kis liye minnat kash e ustād hO
    12. kyā kifāyat is ko iqra’a rabbuka’l akram nahīN

    13. aws mihr e ĥashr par paDh jāye pyāsO to sahee
    14. us gul e khandāN kā ronā giryah e shabnam nahīN

    15. hai unhīN key dam qadam kī bāgh e áālam meiN bahār
    16. woh na they, áālam na thā; gar woh na hoN áālam nahīN

    17. sāyah e dīwār o khāk e dar ho yā rab aur razā
    18. khwāhish e dayhīm e qayşar shawq e takht e jam nahīN
     

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